How to make potato scones…

IMG_5802
me stressing over Christmas

So that was Christmas. How was it for you?

This year was the first time in I can’t remember when (possibly ever!) that both hubby and I have been off work in the few days leading up to Christmas Day. As a result, we were able to ease into it- at the same time as easing our body clocks back onto Sydney time.

We had a fabulous day. Given that we only arrived back on Monday afternoon, we’d decided not to put the Christmas tree up this year, but that changed on Thursday afternoon when I looked at the presents in the middle of the lounge room floor looking all sad and forlorn. Besides, there was the cute cocker spaniel Christmas decoration we’d bought at Liberty that really looks nothing like our cocker spaniel to hang up….

IMG_5804

We’ll just put the tree and maybe a few lights up, I told Miss T. An hour later and it was up, fully lit, fully tinseled and fully decorated.

IMG_5805

The day itself was easy too. These days Christmas lunch for my family is at my sister’s house. We have a combination of hot and cold foods, hubby’s amazing trifle

IMG_5875

and my mum’s pavlova for dessert.

IMG_5873

Afterwards, we fronted up for round 2 in the evening on our friend’s verandah and sipped wine and peeled prawns. It was a fabulous day.

One of our must-haves at Christmas is potato scones for breakfast while we’re unwrapping presents. I think I’ve mentioned before how hubby was born in Scotland, and these scones are part of his heritage- although to call them “scones” is a misnomer. They don’t look anything like what you’d have at tea with jam and cream. For a start, they’re flat. They’re a little like a pikelet- or a blini- but rather than the batter being dropped into the pan, the dough is rolled flat and cut into the desired shapes and cooked on a griddle or hot pan.

We bought some ready mades when and as we saw them while touring around England and Scotland, but they weren’t as light or as yummy as the ones hubby makes.

Anyways, we have them with smoked salmon, sour cream and a little dill for breakfast each Christmas. We have the leftovers with unsalted, sinfully creamy, real butter.

With apologies to gluten free readers, here’s how it’s done.

What you need…

Just 3 things:

About 250g of well mashed potato (hubby put them through the potato ricer this time)

1 tablespoon butter

about ½ cup of plain flour

…oh, and some salt and pepper…

What you do with it…

While the spuds are slightly cooled (really hot potatoes will absorb too much flour and give you a doughy result), stir in the butter, and the seasoning.

IMG_5791

Knead in as much flour as the potato will take to become a pliable dough.

IMG_5793

Roll the dough out thinly and cut into rounds or triangles.

IMG_5794

Prick the surface with a fork.

IMG_5795

Heat a heavy based frying pan, brush the surface with a little oil, and cook the scones in batches for about 3 minutes on each side, or until golden brown.

IMG_5797

Store in a clean tea towel and hope they last until Christmas morning….

IMG_5798

or serve immediately with extra butter…or smoked salmon and creme fraiche.

IMG_5819

Comments

4 comments on “How to make potato scones…”
  1. These potato scones have my name on them. And with smoked salmon – yum!

    1. Jo says:

      Thanks for dropping by…they’re well worth the effort &, because it’s Christmas, the calories don’t count.

  2. Deborah says:

    Those potato scones look nothing like I’d imagined (like scones!) and they look very yummy!!! And using less flour would make them more successful (when using GF flour I assume!)

    1. Jo says:

      It sure would…

Comments are closed.